Revealing a Broader Terrain of Dissociative Manifestations via a Developmental Perspective

Abstract
Dissociation is widely defined as a lack of integration between aspects of experience that are normally integrated. When dissociation is conceptualized primarily or exclusively as a response to trauma, this description can be taken to mean that an initial state of integration has been disrupted by the impact of trauma, or that experiential disconnection (whether reflexive and automatic or volitional) is a form of defense. Thinking of dissociation from the perspective of psychological development introduces an appreciably different additional possibility: that the establishment and integration of various aspects of experience and functioning never fully or stably occurred. When the sustained dissociative state of consciousness exhibited by survivors of complex trauma is construed as reflecting psychological capacities that have never been fully attained due to having grown up in interpersonal environments marked by developmental deprivation, it becomes easier to recognize a range of phenomena that interfere with effective functioning, which otherwise are rarely noticed by practitioners working with complexly dissociative clients. These phenomena are not commonly thought of as dissociative because they are not subsumed under the classic dissociative “symptoms” as described, for example, in the DSM. The more extreme and severe the complex dissociative presentation, however, the more likely they are to be present, and to be identifiable through careful questioning. We will consider the types of dissociative phenomenon associated with developmental deprivation, provide an overview of types of neurobiological processes underlying these dissociative manifestations, and discuss the types.

This session was originally presented as a live conference session in April 2023.

Target Audience

Intermediate

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session participants will be able to:

  • Describe how developmental deficits contribute to dissociative difficulties
  • Describe the three networks comprising Menon's triple network model
  • Explain the difference between performance deficits and skills deficits
  • List two examples of dissociative patterns of functioning that are manifestations of truncated psychological development
  • Identify two strategies for resolving dissociative difficulties via remediation of truncated psychological development
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 3.00 APA
    The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • 3.00 ASWB ACE
    The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD), #1744, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. ISSTD maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 08/20/2021 – 08/20/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 3.00 continuing education credits.
  • 3.00 ISSTD Certificate Program
    This program is eligible for 3.00 credits in the ISSTD Certificate Program.
Course opens: 
11/01/2023
Course expires: 
12/31/2050
ISSTD Member cost:
$59.00
Your Price:
$79.00
Rating: 
0
Presenter: Michael A. Quiñones, PhD
Presenter Bio: Michael A Quiñones, PhD has an independent psychological and forensic services practice in suburban Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He provieds evaluation, psychotherapeutic treatment, and consultation on trauma-related and dissociative disorders. He specializes in the treatment of trauma-related and dissociative disorders, regularly employing therapeutic applications of hypnotherapy, mindfulness practices, psychedelic-induced states and other states of consciousness to empower clients to assume an active role in resolving their difficulties. Dr. Quiñones has conducted workshops on these topics for the Florida Society of Clinical Hypnosis (FSCH) and the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH), and has a number of professional publications on trauma, dissociation, and alternate states of consciousness. This includes an article in the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis on employing hypnosis in the treatment of Complex PTSD, an invited blog post for the organization MIND on the use of ketamine in treating Complex PTSD, and chapters in the books Not Just Bad Kids and Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders, second edition. He has also presetned in workshops on the neurobiology of adverse childhood expereices and developmental trauma, their negative impacts on functioning throughout the lifespan, and consequential effects on brain development. In addition, he is currently working on a book to be published by the American Psychological Association that will lay out a detailed model of how various states of consciousness can be evoked to treat trauma-related disorders by counteracting traumatic states of consciousness. Dr. Quiñones also serves as an expert on psychological trauma and dissociation in both criminal and civil forensic cases.

 

Available Credit

  • 3.00 APA
    The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • 3.00 ASWB ACE
    The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD), #1744, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. ISSTD maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 08/20/2021 – 08/20/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 3.00 continuing education credits.
  • 3.00 ISSTD Certificate Program
    This program is eligible for 3.00 credits in the ISSTD Certificate Program.

Price

ISSTD Member cost:
$59.00
Your Price:
$79.00
Please login or register to take this course.

"Your Price" above reflects your final price based on your membership status and career level. 

  • ISSTD defines a student as those enrolled in a program of study leading to a degree or certification in the mental health field and who have an interest in trauma and dissociation. 
  • ISSTD defines an emerging professional as mental health professionals who have completed an advanced degree and are in the first three years of their career (or first three years after graduation for researchers).
  • If you do not fall into one of the above categories please register as Professional/Retired. 

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